Listview for the terms

  • A
    • alpha-Linolenic acid
    • α-Linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are essential, polyunsaturated fatty acids; they cannot be synthesised by the body and have to be supplied by food.
    • Amino acid
    • Proteins consist of amino acids linked together by so-called peptide bonds.
    • Arachidonic acid
    • The brain consists of approximately 60% fat, of which 40% is DHA (25%) and ARA (15%).
  • B
    • Beta-carotene
    • Beta-carotene is the most abundant and most effective provitamin A (producing vitamin A) in human foods.
    • Beta-Palmitate
    • In human milk nearby half of the calories are supplied by fat. About 98% is in the form of tri-glycerides containing 3 fatty acids attached to glycerol.
    • Biotin
    • Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex and also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H. The "H" in vitamin H comes from the German words for hair and skin, hence the alternative name beauty vitamin.
  • C
    • Calcium
    • Calcium (symbol: Ca) is the most abundant mineral in the human body. About 99% of the calcium in the body is found in bones and teeth and the other 1% in blood and (muscle) cells.
    • Carbohydrates
    • Carbohydrates or saccharides are divided into four groups: monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides.
    • Carob bean gum
    • Carob bean gum is a natural ingredient, obtained from crushing the seed-kernels that are embedded in the long leathery pods of the carob tree.
    • Carotenoids
    • α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin, can be converted by the body to retinol (vitamin A). For this reason they are also called: pro-vitamin A. β-carotene is the most abundant and most effective provitamin A.
    • Casein
    • Casein forms a part of milk protein. Protein is the major structural and functional component of body cells – needed for growth, maintenance and renewal of all body cells and, as intermediates in metabolism.
    • Chloride
    • Chloride is an electrolyte, like sodium and potassium. The human body uses electrolytes for regulating nerve and muscle function and to maintain the water and acid-base balance.
    • Choline
    • Choline is a so-called half-vitamin. It is essential in specific circumstances (e.g. during periods of rapid growth in infants and children).
    • Copper
    • Copper is a trace-element with the symbol Cu. It is a component of many body proteins and found throughout the body: most of the copper is located in the liver, bones and muscle, but traces occur in all body tissues.
  • D
    • Docosahexaenoic acid
    • DHA and ARA are important functional and structural components of the brain. The brain consists of approximately 60% fat, of which 40% is DHA (25%) and ARA (15%).
  • E
    • Eicosapentaenoic acid
    • EPA is important for the developing brain, during pregnancy and early childhood and, for lifetime brain health.
  • F
    • Fat
    • Fat, carbohydrates and protein are the three main macronutrients.
    • Fatty acids
    • Fatty acids can be saturated or unsaturated.
    • Fiber
    • Fibre refers to nutrients in the diet that are not digested by gastrointestinal enzymes. Fibre is widely recognised as beneficial for overall health and a high fibre intake is linked with reduced risk for a number of chronic conditions.
    • Fluoride
    • Fluoride is a trace-element with the symbol F. It is mostly found in bones and teeth. It occurs in soil, water and foods but is also synthesized in laboratories.
    • Folic acid
    • The terms folate and folic acid are often used interchangeably for this water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex. This vitamin is also known as vitamin B9 or folacin.
    • Fructooligosaccharides
    • Fructooligosaccharides (FOS), sometimes called oligofructose, belong to the group of prebiotics or prebiotic fibers.
  • G
    • Galactooligosaccharides
    • Prebiotics or prebiotic fibers are typically oligosaccharides: non-digestible (but fermentable) fibers that beneficially affect growth and function of the ‘good’ bacteria (Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli).
    • Galactose
    • Galactose is a component of lactose (milk sugar).
  • H
  • I
    • Inositol
    • Inositol or myo-inositol is a water-soluble substance with a chemical structure similar to that of glucose.
    • Iodine
    • Iodine is a trace element with the symbol I. The thyroid gland (in the front of the neck) contains most of the iodine in the body.
    • Iron
    • Most of the body’s iron is found in red blood cells (in haemoglobin). It gives blood its red colour.
  • J
  • K
  • L
    • L-Carnitine
    • Carnitine is a dipeptide made from the essential amino acids lysine and methionine. It is found in nearly all cells of the body and especially concentrated in the heart and skeletal muscles.
    • Lactoferrin
    • Lactoferrin is an iron-binding protein in human milk (colostrum, the first breast milk). It is a highly bioactive whey protein.
    • Lactose
    • Lactose is the major carbohydrate in milk and a disaccharide composed of the monosaccharides glucose and galactose.
    • Linoleic acid
    • α-Linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are essential, polyunsaturated fatty acids; they cannot be synthesised by the body and have to be supplied by food.
    • Long chain fatty acids
    • Fatty acids vary in carbon chain length and the number of double bonds in the chain.
    • Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
    • Fatty acids vary in carbon chain length and the number of double bonds in the chain.
  • M
    • Magnesium
    • Magnesium is a mineral with the symbol Mg. Over 50% of all magnesium in the body is found in the skeleton, about 25% in muscles.
    • Maltodextrin
    • Maltodextrin is a glucose polymer. It is usually composed of a mixture of chains that vary from 3-20 glucose units long.
    • Manganese
    • Manganese is a trace-element with the symbol Mn. It is found mostly in bones, the liver, kidneys and pancreas.
    • Milk protein
    • Milk protein can be classified into two major categories: casein and whey protein. Whey protein is rich in the essential amino acids leucine, isoleucine, lysine, tryptophan and threonine. Casein is rich in: histidine, methionine, valine, and phenylalanine
  • N
    • Niacin
    • Niacin (or vitamin B3) is a water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex. Niacin contributes to energy production, proper functioning of the nervous system, normal skin and mucous membranes, proper psychological functions, reduction of tiredness.
    • Nucleotides
    • Nucleotides are non-protein nitrogenous (containing nitrogen) compounds made of three parts: a nucleobase (containing nitrogen), a sugar group and one to three phosphate groups. They are present in every cell.
  • O
    • Oligosaccharides
    • Oligosaccharides: 3–10 monosaccharides linked together that can be hydrolysed by specific enzymes.
    • Omega-3 fatty acids
    • Fatty acids vary in carbon chain length and the number of double bonds in the chain.
    • Omega-6 fatty acids
    • Fatty acids vary in carbon chain length and the number of double bonds in the chain.
  • P
    • Pantothenic acid
    • Pantothenic acid, a water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex is also known as vitamin B5.
    • Phosphorus
    • Most of the body's phosphorus is found in the skeletal system (around 85%) where it works with calcium to build bones.
    • Polysaccharides
    • Polysaccharides are long chains consisting of >10 monosaccharides and sometimes even up to several thousands.
    • Potassium
    • Potassium is a mineral with the symbol K. Potassium is an electrolyte, like sodium and chloride. The human body uses electrolytes for regulating nerve and muscle function and to maintain the water and acid-base balance.
    • Prebiotics
    • Prebiotics or prebiotic fibers are typically oligosaccharides: non-digestible (but fermentable) fibers that beneficially affect growth and function of the ‘good’ bacteria (Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli).
    • Probiotics
    • Probiotics are live microorganisms with potential health benefits. They are live, non-pathogenic (not harmful), microbial food ingredients, most of which are normally found in the healthy human gastrointestinal tract.
    • Protein
    • Proteins consist of amino acids linked together by peptide bonds.
  • Q
  • R
  • S
    • Selenium
    • Selenium is a trace-element with the symbol Se. It is found in all tissues and required for a number of selenium-dependent enzymes called seleno-proteins.
    • Short chain fatty acids
    • Fatty acids vary in carbon chain length and the number of double bonds in the chain.
    • Sodium
    • Sodium is a mineral with the symbol Na. Sodium is an electrolyte, like potassium and chloride. The human body uses electrolytes for regulating nerve and muscle function and to maintain the water and acid-base balance.
    • Sugars
    • Carbohydrates or saccharides are divided into four groups: monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides.
  • T
    • Taurine
    • Taurine is one of the few amino acids not incorporated into proteins. It is a sulphur-containing organic acid but often called an amino acid.
  • U
  • V
    • Vitamin A
    • Vitamin A is the term for fat-soluble compounds related to retinol. It is found in animal sources. Carotenoids, as β-carotene, can be converted to vitamin A (provitamin A, antioxidant). It is found in plant sources.
    • Vitamin B1
    • Vitamin B1, thiamin or thiamine, is a water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex. All B-vitamins are water-soluble, meaning that the body does not store them; they are excreted via the urine.
    • Vitamin B12
    • Cobalamin is another name for vitamin B12. It contains cobalt, which gives this water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex its red colour.
    • Vitamin B2
    • Vitamin B2, riboflavin or lactoflavin, is a water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex. Vitamin B2 is yellow or orange-yellow in colour and used as a natural food colouring.
    • Vitamin B6
    • Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine is a water-soluble vitamin of the B-complex. It refers to a group of closely related compounds.
    • Vitamin C
    • Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin. It is also known as ascorbic acid.
    • Vitamin D
    • There are two major types of vitamin D: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol), which is found in plants, and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), also known as the sunshine vitamin.
    • Vitamin E
    • Vitamin E is the term for a group of fat-soluble compounds with unique antioxidant activities. Alpha- (or α-) tocopherol is the only form that is recognized to meet human requirements.
    • Vitamin K1
    • Vitamin K includes 2 natural, fat-soluble, vitamins: vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) and vitamin K2 (menaquinone). Vitamin K1 is found in plants and the predominant form in the diet.
  • W
    • Whey protein
    • Whey protein forms a part of milk protein. Protein is the major structural and functional component of body cells – needed for growth, maintenance and renewal of all body cells and, as intermediates in metabolism.
    • Whey protein, partially hydrolysed
    • A formula based on partially hydrolysed (whey) protein minimises the risk for the development of an allergy.
  • X
  • Y
  • Z
    • Zinc
    • Zinc is a trace-element with the symbol Zn. It is found in every body cell. Muscles and bones contain most of the body’s zinc. Zinc plays a crucial role as co-factor in many enzymes in the body.